Meat Cuts – Lamb

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Neck
This cut is generally sliced on the bandsaw and used for stewing or curries. As it is on the bone, slow cooking is necessary for the meat to become soft and tender. It has a deep, rich flavour when cooked as there is a high content of fat in the meat.

Recommended Methods:
Stews, Curries, Potjies.

Shoulder
This is a versatile cut that works really well sliced as chops and also slow cooked whole or deboned and cubed. The chops are known as Best End Chops. The Shoulder has a high amount of connective tissue so when it is cooked for a long time it falls off the bone, tender and delicious.

Recommended Methods: Chops grilled or put on the braai, Roasted Whole, Deboned, cubed for curries or stews.

Rib
The ribs are often sliced and put into stewing lamb that is available at the retail outlets. They also make the most fantastic snacks on the braai, sliced and marinated.
Recommended Methods:
(1) Stewing
(2) Sliced and put on the braai.

Loin
The loin is sliced into chops and these are what you will see on restaurants‚ menus when ‚Lamb Chops‚ are served. The meat is tender and a great deal of flavour comes from the fat on the outside of the chop. When grilled, a lot of the fat cooks away but in the process adds flavour to the meat.

Recommended Methods:
Grilled in a pan or on a braai.

Sirloin
The lamb sirloin is sometimes considered part of the leg primal cut, but it can also be prepared separately. In this case, it is frequently cut into chops or steaks and cooked using dry heat.

Lamb sirloin is the cut of meat located just in front of the lamb leg and is sometimes sold along with the leg. Often cut into steaks or chops, it can also be purchased as a boneless roast. A 3-ounce serving of roasted lamb sirloin is an excellent source of protein, vitamin B-12, niacin and zinc.

Leg
This cut has a whole host of different uses and is great for festive occasions or gatherings with friends and family.
Marinating is important with a leg as it absorbs a whole host of different flavours. Some of the best ones to use are garlic, thyme, rosemary and yoghurt.

Recommended Methods:
(1) Sliced and grilled as leg chops (2) Roasted Whole or deboned and butterflied (3) Cubed put into stews and curries.

Hind Shank
The shank is the cut of lamb taken from the lower section of the animal's legs and can be from the front legs (foreshank) or the back legs (hind shank). The foreshank may include part of the shoulder, as well as part of the leg, while the hind shank will include only part of the rear leg.

Flank
A fatty, but incredibly tender cut of meat, the belly is delicious when slow-roasted. It’s also used to make streaky bacon. Pork belly is very high in fat, which makes it a delicious and versatile cut. It can be cooked slowly at a low temperature for soft meat that melts in the mouth, or it can be sliced and crisped up in a hot pan. It can also be roasted or stewed, but make sure you skim away some of the fat. As a robust cut, it works well paired with aromatic flavours and Asian spices.

Breast
Breast of lamb is cut from the belly of the lamb; it is a great cut for those with little experience cooking lamb but wish to yield maximum taste. Although lamb breast has a higher fat content than some other lamb cuts when slow-cooked much of the fat is released during cooking, collected and discarded.

Lamb breast is a value cut that is often underused as it has quite a lot of fat and can be tough if cooked incorrectly. Treat as you would pork belly and you're away to go — the layer of fat brings oodles of flavour and helps to tenderise the meat as it cooks.

Fore Shank
Lamb Shanks come from the front legs of the lamb. They can either be sliced or cooked whole. As with the shoulder of lamb, there is a high amount of connective tissue which results in incredibly tasty meat that falls off the bone when cooked.

Recommended Methods:
Roasted or Braised whole Sliced and cooked in curries or stews

Lamb, the meat from the carcass of a young sheep, is a lean red meat with a mild, but distinctive flavor. The meat of a sheep in its first year is lamb and is generally regarded as “A class”. Once the sheep becomes older and grows bigger it gets a stronger flavour, this meat is known as mutton. Lamb is an extremely versatile form of red meat that is delicious used in curries or put onto the braai.

Our lamb generally comes in from the Free Sate and the Karoo from accredited suppliers such as Malkia, LAW and Tomis which all produce the Lamb.


This cut is generally sliced on the bandsaw and used for stewing or curries. As it is on the bone, slow cooking is necessary for the meat to become soft and tender. It has a deep, rich flavour when cooked as there is a high content of fat in the meat.
Recommended Methods: Stews, Curries, Potjies


This is a versatile cut that works really well sliced as chops and also slow cooked whole or deboned and cubed. The chops are known as Best End Chops. The Shoulder has a high amount of connective tissue so when it is cooked for a long time it falls off the bone, tender and delicious.
Recommended Methods: Chops grilled or put on the braai, Roasted Whole, Deboned, cubed for curries or stews

The Rack of lamb is usually sliced into Rack chops or they are also referred to as Braai Chops. It is characterised by a long bone and a round medallion of tender meat. It can be trimmed and roasted whole, rubbed with different herbs and spices. Chops are best done on the grill or braaied on a hot fire.

Recommended Methods: (1) Roasted Whole (2) Chops on the braai or grill


The loin is sliced into chops and these are what you will see on restaurant menus when Lamb Chops are served. The meat is tender and a great deal of flavour comes from the fat on the outside of the chop. When grilled, a lot of the fat cooks away but in the process adds flavour to the meat.
Recommended Methods: Grilled in a pan or on a braai


This cut has a whole host of different uses and is great for festive occasions or gatherings with friends and family. Marinating is important with a leg as it absorbs a whole host of different flavours. Some of the best ones to use are garlic, thyme, rosemary and yoghurt.
Recommended Methods: (1) Siced and grilled as leg chops (2) Roasted Whole or deboned and butterflied (3) Cubed put into stews and curries


Lamb Shanks come from the front legs of the lamb. They can either be sliced or cooked whole. As with the shoulder of lamb, there is a high amount of connective tissue which results in incredibly tasty meat that falls off the bone when cooked.
Recommended Methods: Roasted or Braised whole Sliced and cooked in curries or stews


The ribs are often sliced and put into stewing lamb that is available at the retail outlets. They also make the most fantastic snacks on the braai, sliced and marinated.
Recommended Methods: (1) Stewing (2) Sliced and put on the braai